www.clematisinternational.com copyright international clematis society

Portland 2019 Logo©Larry Beutler

Portland, Oregon, USA 2019 - Part 3


This is my third and final informal illustrated report on the Society visit and meeting to Portland, Oregon, USA in 2019. As usual, a full set of articles by members of the group will be published in the next journal, Clematis International 2020. To those of you who came along, I hope it will bring back happy memories. To others, perhaps it will encourage you to join us on a future year.

My first report covered the first two days of the meeting, including the Welcome Evening at University Place Hotel, Ainsworth House and Garden, Lan Su Chinese Garden in Portland, Argyle Garden and Winery and Red Ridge Farms/Durant Olive Mill & Vineyards. My second report detailed our visits to Dancing Oaks Nursery, Sebright Gardens, Bauman's Farm and Garden, Silver Star Vinery, the garden of Linda Rectanus and the garden of Vanessa Nagel.

Presentation by Dan Long

Dan Long preparing for his lecture©Ken WoolfendenA relatively leisurely start to today, certainly for those staying at University Place Hotel as Dan's presentation was given in one of their rooms. The title was "Clematis You Need! You Need Clematis!", a celebration of clematis with suggestions for what to grow, where to grow it, how to support it and how to care for it. With the intention of interacting with local gardeners, this presentation was open to the public and it was pleasing to see some new faces.

For those of you who don't know, as well as owning and running Brushwood Clematis and being a Vice-President of the Society, Dan is an avid bee-keeper. So it was not so surprising that, on entering the lecture room, Dan was displaying an opening slide of bees in a flower. However his audience needn't have worried that they'd come into the wrong room as he soon replaced it with his opening Clematis slide.


Visit to Luscher Farm and the Rogerson Clematis Garden

After an early lunch, we boarded our coach for the short drive to Luscher Farm and the Rogerson Clematis Collection. The Society last visited way back in 2010. We had heard that the collection had developed significantly since that time, with more cultivars, advanced displays, more space. Signage had also come on in leaps and bounds. So we were all fascinated to see what it now looked like.

After a welcome speech from Linda Beutler, Past President of this Society and Curator of the Rogerson Clematis Collection, the visit started. The collection is displayed in themed beds, with signage about the clematis planted, their characteristics and origins. There were plenty of volunteers on hand to answer questions. The Rodal Clematis Research Library, named in honour of David and Dorothy Rodal, was open. It contains a very extensive collection of books, magazines, pamphlets and other clematis paraphernalia.
Welcome / Introduction©Ken Woolfenden

Welcome / Introduction
 

Linda Beutler, Curator of the Rogerson Clematis Collection©Ken Woolfenden

Linda Beutler, Curator of the Rogerson Clematis Collection

Rogerson Clematis Garden welcome signxxx©Ken Woolfenden

Rogerson Clematis Garden Welcome Sign

Beginner's Garden©Ken Woolfenden Beginner's Garden©Ken Woolfenden

The Beginner's Garden features cultivars featured in the Society "Clematis for Beginners List".
They were looking wonderful on our visit, proving that it's not difficult to have a great display of clematis.

Baltic Border©Ken Woolfenden

Baltic Border

C. 'Ashva', Russia / Ukraine©Ken Woolfenden

C. 'Ashva', Russia / Ukraine in the Baltic Border

C. 'Sylwia', Poland / Franczak©Ken Woolfenden

C. 'Sylwia', Poland / Franczak in the Baltic Border

C. 'Perle d'Azur'©Ken Woolfenden

C. 'Perle d'Azur' by the Historic Luscher Farmhouse

C. pogonandra var. pilosa (China)©Ken Woolfenden

C. pogonandra var. pilosa (China)

C. otophora (China)©Ken Woolfenden

C. otophora (China)

C. occidentalis var. grosseserrata©Ken Woolfenden

C. occidentalis var. grosseserrata

C. hirsutissima var. scottii©Ken Woolfenden

C. hirsutissima var. scottii

C. columbiana var. tenuiloba©Ken Woolfenden

C. columbiana var. tenuiloba

C. hirsutissima©Ken Woolfenden

C. hirsutissima

C. hexapetala, syn. of C. angustifolia©Ken Woolfenden

C. hexapetala, syn. of C. angustifolia

C. mandshurica©Ken Woolfenden

C. mandshurica

Antipodes Area

The Antipodes©Ken Woolfenden

Part way through the afternoon we gathered around a new area in the Rogerson Clematis Garden, created to display antipodean species clematis. Phyllis McCanna, President of the Friends of the Rogerson Clematis Collection, gave an introduction to this new development within the collection. She then asked Margot Hughes, one of our members with strong links to this part of the world, to unveil the plaque describing the cultivars growing here.

Dedication

Phyllis McCanna, Friends of the Rogerson Clematis Collection President, dedicates the new Antipodes area©Ken Woolfenden

Phyllis McCanna, Friends of the Rogerson Clematis Collection President,
dedicates the new Antipodes area


Unveiling The Antipodes plaque©Ken Woolfenden

Unveiling The Antipodes plaque

The Modern Garden, with strawberries

The Modern Garden plaque©Ken Woolfenden

This area, planted with clematis cultivars introduced since the end of WWII, also has strawberries planted around the base of the clematis as a weed barrier. There were 16 rows of clematis, each row featuring clematis of one colour, making comparison between the blooms and selection of a suitable, colour-coordinating plant easy. Each row also had a different strawberry cultivar planted along the line. This morning, volunteers had been out picking the strawberries in preparation for the Solstice Strawberry Tasting, a joint event with the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon and, fortunately for us, coinciding with our visit. Bowls of each variety were placed on tables. People tasted each variety (one strawberry of each variety only, got to make sure everyone gets a taste) and, if they liked it, put a wooden toothpick into a jar. At the end the sticks were counted and results declared. I can't remember which variety won, but "a good time was had by all"!
Solstice Strawberry Tasting©Ken Woolfenden

planted at the base of the clematis

The Modern Garden©Ken Woolfenden
The Modern Garden©Ken Woolfenden
Solstice Strawberry Tasting©Ken Woolfenden

A few plants to take home!©Ken Woolfenden

A few plants to take home!


Lake Oswego Farmers Market

Our last day started with a visit to Lake Oswego for the Farmers Market, held on Millenium Plaza Park which overlooks Lakewood Bay, at one end of Oswego Lake. The market vendors sell a wide variety of foods, ingredients, arts and crafts, with local cafés, bistros and restaurants close by. In addition to the attractions of the market, the town itself is very interesting. It was further enhanced on our visit by the art sculptures placed around the town, as the town called it, a "Gallery Without Walls". A walking tour of these exhibits was included in handouts provided by the Lake Oswego Farmers Market.
On the steps of Millenium Plaza Park©Ken Woolfenden

On the steps of Millenium Plaza Park

Lake Oswego Farmers Market©Ken Woolfenden

Lake Oswego Farmers Market

Lake Oswego Farmers Market©Ken Woolfenden

Lake Oswego Farmers Market

Lake Oswego town©Ken Woolfenden

Lake Oswego town

Gallery Without Walls - Sunflower©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Sunflower

Gallery Without Walls - Wormy Apple #2©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Wormy Apple #2

Gallery Without Walls - Beacon©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Beacon

Gallery Without Walls - Salmon Romance©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Salmon Romance

Gallery Without Walls - Sail©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Sail

Gallery Without Walls - Complement II©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Complement II

Gallery Without Walls - Living Water 2©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Living Water 2

Gallery Without Walls - Pollinators©Ken Woolfenden

Gallery Without Walls - Pollinators


McCoy Family Nursery

Our final visit of the meeting was to the McCoy Family Nursery. On a lovely sunny afternoon we walked up a gravel track through Douglas Fir forest, past a large lake, until we came to a clearing and some poly-tunnels. This must be the nursery.

Dave McCoy used to work for Bob and Carol Gutmann, who not only ran their own nursery but also gave Brewster Rogerson space in one of their tunnels for his collection. When the Gutmanns decided to retire, Dave and his wife, Chris, decided to start their own nursery. This is a wholesale nursery supplying the Pacific NorthWest with large-flowered hybrids and many viticellas, along with other clematis cultivars.

The nursery runs with the help of various machinery and equipment which Dave designed and made.
Poly-tunnels in the clearing©Ken Woolfenden

Poly-tunnels in the clearing

Introduction to the nursery by Dave and Chris©Ken Woolfenden

Introduction to the nursery by Dave and Chris

Trays of new clematis©Ken Woolfenden

Trays of new clematis

Excellent root growth©Ken Woolfenden

Excellent root growth

Automated potting table, designed and built by Dave©Ken Woolfenden

Automated potting table, designed and built by Dave

Neat rows of clematis waiting to be shipped©Ken Woolfenden

Neat rows of clematis waiting to be shipped

Modified trolley for easy moving of clematis tables©Ken Woolfenden

Modified trolley for easy moving of clematis tables

Small distraction©Ken Woolfenden

Small distraction


Gala Dinner

Our Gala Dinner was served in the Astoria Room in University Place Hotel. Served in this private room, it was an excellent dinner, made even better by being accompanied by some very good local wines. It was a fitting finish to yet another enjoyable and interesting meeting.
Gala Dinner©Ken Woolfenden Gala Dinner©Ken Woolfenden
Gala Dinner©Ken Woolfenden Gala Dinner©Ken Woolfenden
Gala Dinner©Ken Woolfenden

I hope you've enjoyed my third and final report. For those of you who missed either of the previous reports, or wish to re-read them, please click here for my first report or here for my second report.


Return to top of page


Return to Homepage

@ K.Woolfenden